Tag Archives: Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADDs): Past and Present

If you’re an energy-statistics nerd (which you probably are if you’ve found your way to this blog), you’ve no doubt seen various regional data expressed by PADD, or Petroleum Administration for Defense District. Referring to barrels of oil sent from one PADD to another or which PADD uses certain fuel types for home heating  allows for a useful shorthand for regions of the United States and their energy related statistics. Many people who come across the PADD system might already understand PADDs to be a bygone classification system from the country’s fuel rationing days, but most people’s understanding of the PADD system stops here and the history of PADDs are not explored any further.

 

That’s where this article comes in! This piece will serve to explain what the PADDs are, where they originated, how they evolved over the years, and how they are relevant today.



What are PADDs?

Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts, or PADDs, are quite simply the breaking down of the United States into different districts.
PADD 1 is referred to as the East Coast region and, because of its size, is further divided into three subdistricts:
  • PADD 1A, or New England, comprises Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont;
  • PADD 1B, or Central Atlantic, comprises Delaware, the District of Columbia, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania; and
  • PADD 1C, or Lower Atlantic, comprises Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, and West Virginia.

PADD 2 is referred to as the Midwest region and comprises Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Tennessee, and Wisconsin.

PADD 3 is referred to as the Gulf Coast region and comprises Alabama, Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, New Mexico, and Texas.

PADD4 is referred to as the Rocky Mountain region and comprises Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Utah, and Wyoming.

PADD5 is referred to as the West Coast region and comprises Alaska, Arizona, California, Hawaii, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington.

New PADDs

There are also two additional PADDs after the original five PADDs that rarely get mentioned, likely because they are much newer and the volume of oil products going in and/or out of them are minimal compared with the rest. Despite a mention of them in the Energy Information Administration‘s (EIA) write up of the PADD system,  PADDs 6 and 7 (meant to cover U.S. territories around the world) do not have data on them included on the prominent, publicly-facing EIA data sets. However, some digging shows that PADD 6 was added in 2015 in order to properly report needed information to the International Energy Agency and comprises the U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico, while PADD 7 includes GuamAmerican Samoa, and the Northern Mariana Islands Territory. You will commonly find sources citing just five total PADDs, but don’t let that throw you off. Simply impress those you meet at energy cocktail parties by memorizing what territories are in PADDs 6 and 7.

Origin of PADDs

The federal government first established the regions that would become the five PADDs during World War II. Specifically, the Petroleum Administration for War was established as an independent agency by Executive Order 9276 in 1942 in order to organize and ration the various oil and petroleum products to ensure the military had all the fuel it needed. Part of that organization process was the establishment of these five districts as a tool for that goal. The Petroleum Administration for War ended in 1946 after the war efforts were over, but these five original districts were quickly reestablished by the successor Petroleum Administration for Defense that was created by Congress in 1950 in response to the Korean War. This Administration provided these districts with the name Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts.


Source

Changes over time

As stated, the original function of the PADDs was to ensure proper distribution of oil supplies during World War II. In fact, the Department of Defense made use of the PADD system to redirect oil resources to specific PADDs  in response to Nazi attacks on U.S. tankers. These oil distribution efforts were the largest and most intricate such efforts yet, leading to the realization that interstate pipelines would soon become necessary to connect oil refineries with distant U.S. markets. But once World War II ended, the government determined there was no more need for the Petroleum Administration for War, and gone with the Administration were the districts.

After the Petroleum Administration for Defense revived the five districts, they were then under the management of the Department of Interior’s Oil and Gas Division, with the continued function to ensure the oil needs of the military, government, industry, and civilians of the United States were met. As with the Petroleum Administration for War, the Petroleum Administration for Defense was short-lived and was abolished just four years later by the Secretary of the Interior’s Order 2755 in April of 1954. Even though the government agency was eliminated, the names and organization of the various PADDs continued to be used ever since.

One significant change over the history of PADDs that is important to note is that there are no present day ‘official’ government keepers. While the PADDs served an official function and thus had official definitions set out by government agencies during World War II and the Korean War, that is no longer the case today– but that does not mean they are no longer significant. Within the Department of Energy (DOE), EIA uses the PADDs extensively in its aggregation and dissemination of data (discussed in more detail next). Further, government agencies have defined PADDs for use within specific regulations. For example, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) codified PADDs in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) when regulating motor vehicle diesel fuel sulfur use (though it explicitly dictates that the definition is only applicable as codified for that specific regulation) and specified total benchmarks and reductions that were to be met PADD-wide, as well as in reporting requirements regarding fuel additives so that they get published by PADD.

Use of PADDs today

With the government being out of the business rationing oil and petroleum since the end of the Korean War, the PADDs have found new purpose. The same PADDs have survived to allow analysis of data and patterns of crude oil and petroleum product movements within (and outside) the United States. Using these PADDs, government and industry players are able to ensure they are using the same regional collection of states and shorthand language to analyze and spot trends within regions instead of being confined to looking at the nation as a whole or analyzing on a more state-by-state basis.

Further, the PADDs are separated in a way that makes analysis straightforward. For example, following the crude supply in PADDs 2 and 3 are the most important to crude prices because they contain the largest number of refineries. Heating oil demand is mostly concentrated in PADD 1, making that the region to look at when investigating heating oil prices. Additionally, using the language of PADDs enable quick insights into data such as EIA noting the impact of Hurricane Harvey on flow of propane from PADD 2 to PADD 3 or detailing how PADD 1C needed to supplement its gasoline inventories with foreign imports when there was an accident that shutdown the pipeline that typically supplies the area with gasoline from PADD 2.

Examples of trends, statistics, and PADD characteristics

There are plenty of other examples of the usefulness of dealing with oil-related data within PADDs. A common example is to delineate from where different PADDs receive their oil. For example, with the knowledge that almost half of U.S. refining capacity is on the Gulf Coast (i.e., PADD 3) while less than 10% of refining capacity is on the East Coast (PADD 1) (though PADD 1 contains about one third of the U.S. population), an obvious conclusion is that there must be a lot of intra-PADD oil shipments everyday. In fact, about half of the oil consumed everyday by PADD 1 is supplied from PADD 3 over pipeline, rail, truck, and barge.

Going further, much of the commonly distributed data from EIA (click here to learn about the vast data available from EIA and how to navigate it all) utilizes PADDs. For example, EIA allows you to look at the following:

and much more.

So hopefully the next time you read a table from EIA that deals with oil movement specific to PADD 3 or read a news article citing the disruption of a pipeline that serves PADD 1, this article will come to mind and you’ll be better served to speak to it– and remember to try and win some bets with your knowledge of the seldom-mentioned PADDs 6 and 7!
Sources and additional reading:
About the author: Matt Chester is an energy analyst in Washington DC, studied engineering and science & technology policy at the University of Virginia, and operates this blog and website to share news, insights, and advice in the fields of energy policy, energy technology, and more. For more quick hits in addition to posts on this blog, follow him on Twitter @ChesterEnergy.  

Best from “Today in Energy” in 2017

Among the wide array of regular articles the Energy Information Administration (EIA) releases, as detailed in this post on navigating EIA’s data sets , one of the most varied and interesting is the Today in Energy (TIE) series of articles released every weekday. According to EIA, TIE articles “provide topical, timely, short articles with energy news and information you can understand and use.”   

What makes TIE particularly compelling to read each day is that the topics it covers range across the spectrum of energy-related topics. Where most of the other reports released by the EIA are restricted to a specific fuel type or survey of consumers, TIE articles bring all of these topics from across EIA into relevant, digestible, and fascinating briefs to give a broad spectrum of information to its readers.



Further, TIE articles feature both stories that are relevant and important to current events (e.g., Hurricane Irma may cause problems for East Coast energy infrastructure) and stories that provide useful background information that can be referenced for years to come (e.g., Crude oil distillation and the definition of refinery). Not only that, but keeping up with TIE articles is a great way to keep up with other EIA publications as well, such as when articles such as the Annual Energy Outlook, International Energy Outlook, or Short-Term Energy Outlook are posted, TIE often includes an overview of some of the relevant conclusions of those articles and a link to read the full version.

To prove how valuable TIE articles can be for all these reasons, I’ve picked a sampling of 13 of my favorite TIE articles thus far in 2017 that are particularly interesting and demonstrate the cross-cutting topics offered by TIE. The ones I’ve chosen are based on the topics I find the most engaging, as well as the graphics that are the most clever and elegant.

1. EIA’s AEO2017 projects the United States to be a net energy exporter in most cases

January 5, 2017

Released the same morning as the Annual Energy Outlook 2017 (AEO2017), this article demonstrates the tendency of TIE to alert the readers of the latest EIA publications, while also providing a good overview to new readers as to what AEO2017 is and what the main takeaways from the report were.

2. Canada is the United States’ largest partner for energy trade

March 1, 2017

Utilizing the latest data from the U.S. census bureau, this article details the energy imports/exports between the United States and Canada broken out by U.S. region and fuel type and demonstrates TIE articles on the topic of trade. Most interesting is the graph showing the difference in electricity trade over the years from each of four U.S. regions.

Source: Energy Information Administration

3. U.S. energy-related CO2 emissions fell 1.7% in 2016

April 10, 2017

This TIE article from April breaks down carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions data, from the Monthly Energy Review, from 2005 to 2016 by both emitting fuel and industry, while also introducing carbon intensity as a metric and shows the progress made in reducing energy-related carbon intensity over the previous decade. As climate change heats up as an issue in domestic politics, industry, and foreign affairs, this type of window into U.S. CO2 emission data can prove invaluable.

4. Most U.S. nuclear power plants were built between 1970 and 1990

April 27, 2017

I chose this article because it provides a fascinating chart that shows the initial operating year of utility-scale generation capacity across the United States, broken out by fuel type, to demonstrate the relative age of each source of electricity generation and, in particular, the relative old age of the U.S. nuclear generating capacity, while also showing the explosion of non-hydroelectric renewable generation since the turn of the century.

Source: Energy Information Administration

5. American households use a variety of lightbulbs as CFL and LED consumption increases

May 8, 2017

An example of a TIE article getting into the use of energy inside of U.S. homes, this piece takes information from the 2015 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) to show how residential lighting choices have been trending in the face of increased regulation and availability of energy-efficient lighting technologies, highlighting the differences depending on renter vs. owner occupied, household income, and whether or not an energy audit has been performed.

6. More than half of small-scale photovoltaic generation comes from residential rooftops

June 1, 2017

Utilizing data from the Electric Power Monthly, this article breaks out the use of small-scale solar power systems based on the geographic location and type of building, highlighting the rapid rise these systems have experienced in the residential sector, as a great example of renewable energy in the residential sector.

7. Dishwashers are among the least-used appliances in American homes

June 19, 2017

Again taking data from RECS, this TIE article provides insights on the frequency that certain appliances are in American homes, how often they go unused in those homes, pervasiveness of ENERGY STAR compliant appliances, and other data regarding residential energy use of appliances. This article also includes a plug for the 2017 EIA Energy Conference that was to be held a week after its publication, again showing how good of a job reading TIE articles daily can do of making sure you know the latest happenings at EIA.

8. Earthquake trends in Oklahoma and other states likely related to wastewater injection

June 22, 2017

A reason I find this TIE article particularly interesting is that it goes beyond just the energy data collected by EIA and synchs with outside data from the Earthquake Catalog to show additional effects of energy production in the environment. This kind of interplay of data sources demonstrates how powerful EIA data collection can be when analyzed in proper context.

9. Monthly renewable electricity generation surpasses nuclear for the first time since 1984

July 6, 2017

I highlight this TIE article for two reasons. First, the graphic below showing the monthly generation of nuclear compared with the cumulative generation of renewable energies—and the highlighting of 2016-17 particular—is really illuminating. This graph is a great demonstration of the power of data visualizations to convey the data and the message of that data. Second, the reason behind that graphic—that monthly renewable generation surpassed nuclear generation for the first time in over three decades—is a remarkable achievement of the renewable energy sector, showing the trending direction of the U.S. fuel mix going forward.

Source: Energy Information Administration

10. California wholesale electricity prices are higher at the beginning and end of the day

July 24, 2017

This TIE article was identified because of how interesting the topic of wholesale electricity prices varying throughout the day can be. As net metering and residential production of electricity increases across the United States, this will be a topic those in the energy fields will want to keep a keen eye on.

11. Among states, Texas consumes the most energy, Vermont the least

August 2, 2017

Grabbing data from the State Energy Data System, this TIE article presents a graphic displaying the most and least overall energy use as well as the most and least energy use per capita among the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Using color to demonstrate the relative consumption and consumption per capita creates a pair of really elegant visuals.

Source: Energy Information Administration

 

12. Solar eclipse on August 21 will affect photovoltaic generators across the country

August 7, 2017

As everyone was scrambling to find their last minute eclipse glasses, this TIE article detailed where, and how much, the total solar eclipse of August 2017 was to diminish solar photovoltaic capacity and an assessment of how local utilities will be able to handle their peak loads during this time (a nice follow up TIE article on this also looked at how California dealt with these issues on the day of the eclipse, increasing electricity imports and natural gas generation).

Source: Energy Information Administration

13. U.S. average retail gasoline prices increase in wake of Hurricane Harvey

September 6, 2017

Another example of TIE addressing energy-related current events, this article not only provides the information and analysis of the effect that Hurricane Harvey had on retail gasoline prices, but it also provides the context of why the effect was being felt, how it compared to previous hurricanes, and what could be expected moving forward.

 

 

If you’ve been sufficiently convinced that Today in Energy articles would be an engaging read to start the day, you can sign up for an email subscription by following this link.

 

 

About the author: Matt Chester is an energy analyst in Washington DC, studied engineering and science & technology policy at the University of Virginia, and operates this blog and website to share news, insights, and advice in the fields of energy policy, energy technology, and more. For more quick hits in addition to posts on this blog, follow him on Twitter @ChesterEnergy.  

Navigating the Vast EIA Data Sets

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is an independent arm the Department of Energy (DOE) that is tasked with surveying, analyzing, and disseminating all forms of data regarding energy in the United States. Further, EIA is a politically isolated wing of the DOE– meaning it is there to provide independent and factual data and analysis, completely independent from the partisan decision makers in Washington or the political inclinations of those in charge of at the top of DOE. Because that is the case, you can be confident the data put out by EIA is not driven by any agenda or censored in favor of a desired conclusion.

Thus for anyone with even a passing interest in the national production and use of energy, EIA really is a treasure trove of valuable information. However, those who are unfamiliar with navigating the EIA resources can easily get overwhelmed by the vastness of the data at their fingertips. Additionally, even seasoned veterans of the federal energy landscape might find it difficult to find the exact piece of data for which they are digging within the various reports and data sets made publicly available on the EIA website. So regardless of your experience level, what follows is a brief guide to what type of information is available as well as some advice as to how to make the best use of your time surfing around EIA.gov.



Types of data available

One of the really fabulous things about the EIA data sets is that they cover every kind of energy you can imagine. The energy categories you can focus into include, but are not limited to, the following:

Within these energy categories, you can look at the trends of production, consumption, imports/exports, and carbon dioxide emissions going back years (oftentimes even decades) and also modeled as a forecast into the coming years. Most data sets will have tools to automatically manipulate the data to change between units (e.g., total barrels of oil vs. barrels of oil per day), or even manipulate data trends (e.g., go from weekly data to 4-week moving averages to 10-year seasonal averages). Depending on the type of data, these numbers are regularly updated weekly, monthly, and/or yearly. If there’s a topic of particular interest, there’s a good chance there’s a report with the data on it being released at regular intervals– some of the more prominent reports are highlighted below.

Regularly updated reports

EIA releases a regular stream of reports that serve to update the publicly available data at given intervals. Some of the more prominent reports are listed below, and they are typically used to update all of the energy categories previously mentioned:

  • The Monthly Energy Review (MER) is a fairly comprehensive report on energy statistics, both from the past month and historically back a number of decades. Published during the last week of every month, the MER includes data on national energy production, consumption, and trade across petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear, renewables– as well as energy prices, carbon dioxide emissions, and international petroleum.
  • The Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) is another monthly EIA report, this one released on the first Tuesday following the first Thursday of the month. The STEO includes data on much the same topics as the MER, with the inclusion of some international energy data, and it also includes monthly and yearly projections for the rest of the current year and all of  the next year based on EIA’s predictive models. The inclusions of these forecasts makes for particularly useful data sets for anyone who might be trying to stay a step ahead of the energy markets. Also of particular interest for statistically-minded people out there is a regular comparison of numbers between the current STEO forecast and the previous month’s forecast. These comparisons show which way the model shows data to be trending, with the more significant ones called out in the report and noted with reasoning behind the changes.
  • The Annual Energy Outlook (AEO), like the STEO, provides modeled projections of energy markets– though the AEO focuses just on U.S. energy markets, models these annual forecasts long-term through the year 2050, and is released every January. The other aspect of the AEO that makes it particularly interesting is that its modeled forecasts, in addition to a reference case forecast, include different assumptions on economic, political, and technological conditions and calculate how those various assumptions might affect the outlook. For example, the 2017 AEO includes projections based on high economic growth vs. low economic growth, high oil price vs. low oil price, high investment in oil and gas resources and technology vs. low investment, and a projection that assumes a complete roll-back of the Clean Power Plan.
  • The International Energy Outlook (IEO) provides forecast energy market data consistent with the AEO, but regarding the international energy market through 2040.
    • With forecasts in both the STEO and the AEO, an understanding of exactly what is meant by the forecasts is imperative. The forecasts and projections do not necessarily reflect what a human prognosticator within EIA thinks could, should, or will happen– rather it demonstrates what the predictive models calculate given the best possible and unbiased inputs available. This difference is a subtle one, but if you ever find yourself questioning “does the person behind this report really think this is going to happen?”, recognize that some nuance exists and the reason you are skeptical might have not yet been able to be statistically included in the model.
  • The State Energy Data System (SEDS) is published once annually and breaks down national energy use, price, spending, and production by sector and by individual states. Within each of these categories, you can also break down the data by energy type (e.g., coal vs. natural gas) and by primary energy use vs. electric power generation. Having this granularity is useful to further dig into if certain energy trends are regional, restricted to certain climates, or are in response to specific state policies.

While they are not necessarily releasing new and specific data on a regular basis, two other EIA articles of note are worth pointing out because of the interesting stories and analyses they tell:

  • Today in Energy (TIE) comes out every weekday and gives a quick and readable article with energy news, analyses, and updates designed to educate the audience on the relevant energy issues. TIE frequently features graphs and charts that elegantly demonstrate the data in an easy to understand but also vastly elucidating way. One of the real advantages to reading TIE each day, though, is they often include tidbits from all the previously mentioned regularly updated reports, as well as other major releases or EIA conferences, enabling you to keep up with the newest information from EIA (click here for a post on the best TIE articles of 2017 to get you started).
  • This Week in Petroleum (TWIP) is an article that comes out every Wednesday that is very similar to the TIE articles, but focuses on the world of petroleum specifically and provides crucial insights on topics such as drilling, oil company investments, retail prices, inventories, transportation of crude and refined petroleum products, and more.

If any of these regular reports are of interest to you, you can sign up to get email alerts anytime these (or a number of other) reports are released by EIA by visiting this page. If you don’t know which reports you’d want but you want to keep an eye on what EIA is putting out, you can also simply subscribe to the “This Week at EIA” list that will once a week send you an email to notify you of ALL the new EIA productions from that week.

Finding specific data

While keeping up with all the regular reports from EIA is immensely useful, what brings many people to the EIA website is the search for a specific piece of data. You might want to see a history of average gasoline prices in a certain region of the country, find the projection of how much solar capacity is expected to be added in the next few years, track how much petroleum product is being refined in the Gulf Coast, or countless other facts and figures. Below you’ll find a few strategies you can employ to track down the information you seek.

Navigating the menus

EIA.gov has a useful menu interface through which you can usually navigate to your desired dataset easily.

Source: Homepage of EIA.gov
  • The “Sources & Uses” drop down will be where you can navigate to data sets about specific fuel sources and energy use;
  • The “Topics” drop down highlights the analysis on data by EIA as well as economic and environmental data; and
  • The “Geography” drop down is where you can navigate data by state or look at international data.
Source: Homepage of EIA.gov

Navigating from these menus is fairly self-explanatory, but let’s walk through the example of finding the recent history of gasoline prices in the Gulf Coast region of the United States. Gasoline is a petroleum product, so we would click on “Petroleum & Other Liquids” under the “Sources & Uses” menu.

Once on the “Petroleum & Other Liquids” page, the information we’re interested in would be under the data menu with the “Prices” link.

Source: Landing page for EIA.gov/petroleum

You’ll then see a listing of various regular releases of petroleum product price reports and data sets. Since we’re interested in Gulf Coast gasoline prices, we’ll click the third link for “Weekly retail gasoline and on-highway diesel prices.”

Source: EIA’s Petroleum and Other Liquids Prices

Clicking on this report will bring up the below interactive table. The default view will be to show U.S. prices averaged weekly. The time frame can be adjusted to monthly or annual prices (we’ll keep it at weekly). The location of the prices can be changed to allow viewing of data by region of the country or by select states and cities (we’ll change it to the Gulf Coast). The interactive table then displays the most recent week’s data as well as the previous five weeks (note: for ‘gas prices’ as is most often reported in the media and related to people filling up the gas tanks in their cars, we’re interested in the row titled ‘Regular’).

Source: EIA’s Weekly Retail Gasoline and Diesel Prices

If you’re interested in going further back in time then shown in the interactive table, the ‘View History’ links can be clicked to bring up an interactive table and graph going as far back as EIA has data (1992, in this case), shown below. Alternatively, if you want to have the raw data to manipulate yourself in Microsoft Excel, then click the ‘Download Series History’ link in the upper left (I’ll download and keep this data, perhaps handy for later in this post).

Source: EIA’s Weekly Gulf Coast Regular All Formulations Retail Gasoline Prices

Note in the above interactive chart there is the built-in abilities to view history by weekly/monthly/annual data, to download the source data, or the adjust the data to be a moving average or seasonal analysis.

If you find a page with the type of information you’ll want to reference regularly or check in on the data as they update, be sure to bookmark the URL for quick access!

STEO Custom Table Builder

Another useful tool is the STEO Custom Table Builder, which can be found here. The Custom Table Builder allows you to find all of the data that is included in the monthly STEO report (e.g., U.S. and international prices, production, and consumption for petroleum products, natural gas, electricity, coal, and renewable energy; CO2 emission data based on source fuel and sector; imports and exports of energy commodities; U.S. climate and economic data broken down by region; and more). This data can be tracked back to 1997 or projected forward two years on a monthly, quarterly, or annual basis. All you need to do is go to the Custom Table Builder, shown below, and select the options you wish to display.

Source: EIA’s Custom Table Builder

As an example, let’s use the STEO Custom Table Builder to determine the projected of how much solar power capacity in the near term. Solar would fall under the ‘U.S. Renewable Energy’ category, so click to expand that category, then expand the ‘Renewable Energy Capacity,’ and you’ll see the STEO has data for data for the capacity of large-scale solar for power generation, large-scale solar for other sectors, and small-scale solar for other sectors.

Source: EIA’s Custom Table Builder

Select all the data relevant to solar data, select the years you want (we’ll look at 2017 thus far through the end of 2018), and what frequency you want the data (we’ll look at monthly). Then hit submit, and the following will be the custom table built for you.

Source: EIA’s Custom Table Builder

Note: The forecast data is indicated in the Custom Table Builder with the numbers shown in italics. The above data was pulled before the September 2017 STEO was published, so the projections begin with the month of August 2017.

For this example, we’ll want to then download all the data to excel so the total solar capacity can be added up and analyzed. Click the ‘Download to Excel’ button at the upper right to get the raw data, and with a few minutes in Microsoft Excel you can get the below chart:

Source of Data: EIA.gov, pulled on September 10, 2017

This graph, made strictly from STEO Custom Table Builder data, shows the following:

  • As of July 2017, large-scale solar generation capacity was only 0.3 GW outside of the power sector and 23.7 GW, while small-scale solar generation capacity was 14.8 GW.
  • Together, solar power capacity in the United States added up to 39.1 GW as of July 2017.
  • By the end of 2018, total solar power capacity is projected to rise to 53.7 GW (an increase of 14.5 GW, or 37%), according to the EIA’s August 2017 STEO.

Search function

Using a search bar on some websites can be surprisingly frustrating, but luckily the EIA search function is very accurate and useful. So, I have found that, when in doubt, simply doing a search on EIA.gov is the best option.

Perhaps I want to track the amount of petroleum products in production on the Gulf Coast. This information is not in the STEO report, so the Custom Table Builder won’t be of use. And maybe I don’t immediately see how to navigate to this specific information on the menus. I would type into the search bar the data I’m seeking as specific as possible—‘weekly gulf coast refiner gasoline production’:

Source: Homepage of EIA.gov

Doing the above search yields the below results, of which the first one looks like just what we need.

Source: EIA.gov

Click on that first link, and ta-da! We’re taken to the weekly gasoline refinery report for the Gulf Coast (referred to as PADD 3). Again, you see the options here to look at the history back to 1994 both on a weekly and a 4-week average basis, use the chart tools to analyze moving averages or seasonal analyses, or download the data to utilize in your own way.

Source: Weekly Gulf Coast Refiner and Blender Net Production of Conventional Motor Gasoline

Contact experts

As a last resort, the EIA website offers resources to contact should you have questions or issues navigating the data. The people behind the EIA data are civil servants who are intelligent and very dedicated to their job and making sure you get the accurate and relevant information you need. So in a pinch, head to the Contact Us page and find the topic on which you need help from a subject matter expert.

If you want an alternative to going straight to the people at EIA, however, feel free to contact me as well and I’d be happy to try and help you track down information on EIA.gov as well. Use any of the contact methods mentioned in the Contact Page of this site, or leave a comment on this post.

Using the data

I have found that it is not at all an exaggeration to say that the world (of energy data, at least) is at your fingertips with EIA’s publicly available data. To demonstrate, I’ll walk through a quick example of what you can find.

If we take the previously gathered weekly data for Gulf Coast gasoline prices and gasoline production, we can plot them on the same graph:

Source of Data: EIA.gov, pulled on September 10, 2017

By taking advantage of the publicly data on EIA’s website, we can notice some trends on our own. In the above, there is a drastic increase in Gulf Coast gasoline prices, coincident with a large decrease in Gulf Coast refiner production of gasoline that bucks the month-long trend of production generally increasing. This is a curious change and would prompt investigation as to the reason why. Luckily, several of EIA’s Today in Energy articles already points out this trend and offers explanation—all related to the effects of Hurricane Harvey on the Gulf Coast petroleum systems (Article 1, Article 2, Article 3). Just goes to show that one of the best way to stay abreast of trends and information in the energy world is to follow EIA’s various reports and analyses.

 

Updated on September 28, 2017

 

 

 

About the author: Matt Chester is an energy analyst in Washington DC, studied engineering and science & technology policy at the University of Virginia, and operates this blog and website to share news, insights, and advice in the fields of energy policy, energy technology, and more. For more quick hits in addition to posts on this blog, follow him on Twitter @ChesterEnergy.